Top tips for making your website look awesome

Top tips for making your website look awesome

Like people, websites also need to be dressed for success. Here’s how you can make yours look impressive and have visitors eager to do business with you.

Make a statement with professional photographs

Before site visitors read what’s on your website, they assess it by checking out your images. A picture is indeed worth a thousand words, but are those words truly what you want to convey to your audience?

Blurry, outdated, or irrelevant pictures tell your site visitors that you don’t care about their browsing experience. In-house photos are the best option, but stock images shouldn’t cause any problems as long as they are optimized for mobile viewing and relevant to your content.

Help visitors find what they want with search tools

If your set of offerings is not expansive, a simple navigation menu ought to help visitors find what they need. However, the deeper your catalog gets, the more you’ll need additional tools. One way is to affix a search bar in your header so that people can use keywords to scour your site. Another way is to engage visitors via chat. You can preprogram a chatbot to ask questions that narrow down a visitor’s intention, or you can have a live agent address a visitor’s concerns in real time.

The more helpful your website is, the more it will foster trust in your brand and make visitors more likely to do business with you.

Extra tip:
Reduce the number of clicks a visitor has to make to achieve their objectives. For instance, eschew using the “Read more” link on product descriptions on product details pages. Visitors dive into a product page because they’re interested in fully learning more about the product, and the “Read more” link just hinders them from doing so.

Present your case clearly with good copywriting

The last thing you want to do is to confuse and frustrate your customers, so it’s important to keep all of your product or service descriptions as straightforward and simple as possible. If what you’re selling has detailed information, such as dimensions or technical requirements, make sure that they’re easy to read and are typed out.

Don’t use screenshots of information tables because web visitors compare offerings by collating information from different sellers. If your information is displayed in the form of an image, you’ll force users to type the info themselves. You’ll immediately lose the ones who don’t want that sort of hassle.

Let visitors get to know your company better in the About Us page

Your brand needs a story behind it that customers can relate to. Every company website should have an About Us page that describes your team, your company culture, and what sets you apart from the competition. Whatever your story is, make sure it’s accessible from any page on your site.

Hire a professional web designer

If your budget is tight, there are DIY site builders specifically geared toward small businesses. Or for a relatively low monthly fee, you can hire a managed website provider. A website provider will take care of:

  • Form – They’ll make your site look impressive on any screen size.
  • Function – The provider will ensure that your site is easy to use and works as expected, whether you’re using a keypad and mouse or just your finger or stylus.
  • Fixes – If something in your site is broken or you want to make changes to it (such as integrating an appointment scheduling app), they will handle it for you.

With more revenue originating online, small- and medium-sized business owners can’t afford to overlook the importance of creating a fully functional website. For more information on building a modern website, call us today!

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Should you monitor your employees’ online activities?

Should you monitor your employees’ online activities?

To monitor or not to monitor — that is the question. Employee monitoring is a touchy subject. If you’ve ever considered it, then you may ask yourself if it is a good idea for an employer to check on their staff’s online activities. Below are the pros and cons of employee monitoring, and some helpful tips should you push through with it.

The case for monitoring

Here are several reasons why monitoring your employees’ activities on company devices is a good idea. It can help you:

  • Protect your organization from data theft or harm – because careless or disgruntled employees may leak or steal your data.
  • Ensure you have a harassment-free workplace – because cyberharassment (sexual or otherwise) happens among employees.
  • Ensure members of your staff comply with policies – such as not downloading illegal programs or spending time on websites with illegal or hostile content.
  • Provide evidence in case of a lawsuit – should an employee participate in illegal activities using your business’s computers (heaven forbid!), monitoring their device can provide evidence of their involvement.

Sadly, many business owners who monitor their employees often discover that their staff members aren’t focused solely on the company’s success.

Arguments against employee monitoring

Of course, you should also be aware of the potential downsides to monitoring. These include:

  • Productivity loss – monitoring can put a damper on employee morale, and you may see the distrust leading to productivity losses.
  • Lost privacy and lawsuits – you’ll likely learn personal details about your employees that you would’ve never known about had you not monitored them. You may discover their political or religious views, sexual orientation, or medical problems. This subjects your business to potential privacy or discrimination issues if you or your management team acts negatively based on any of this information.

Monitoring guidelines to follow

If you decide to monitor your employees, here are a few tips you should follow.

1. Create written policies
When you monitor your employees, ask yourself: “Am I doing this for security purposes? Is it to ensure my employees aren’t wasting time on games or social media?” If your monitoring policies are too strict, you could create an atmosphere of distrust.

Set guidelines for acceptable use of email and social media, web browsing, instant messaging, and downloading software and apps. Also, make sure to include how monitoring will be carried out and how data will be used, secured, and destroyed.

2. Tell your employees
It’s important to inform your employees about the scope of your monitoring policies. If they find out you’re doing it secretly, you could face legal issues. By being transparent, you may actually see a boost in productivity by deterring employees from wasting time on the web.

When you tell your employees, explain why you’re doing it and the risks your business faces from misuse of digital assets. Reassure them you’re not doing it to spy on their personal life, but to create a compliant and law-abiding workplace. Because their activities will now be less private, encourage your staff to use their smartphones for personal matters. Also, provide your employees a copy of your written policy for them to read and sign.

3. Get the right technology tools
You don’t need to know each and every employee activity, so look for apps and software that alert you of the most relevant problems, so you can focus on more important tasks.

If implemented correctly, employee monitoring makes your business more secure and productive. For more information about security and other IT support tools, get in touch with us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Cutting IT hardware costs with thin and zero clients

Cutting IT hardware costs with thin and zero clients

If you want to cut costs on IT hardware, don’t settle for cheap but old or low-quality machines. They’ll likely offer subpar performance, which will hurt your team’s productivity. What’s worse, they’ll likely break down often, too, which means the money you initially saved will go to repairs and upgrades. Instead of buying low-end machines, you should consider buying thin or zero clients.

What are thin and zero clients?

Thin clients are stripped-down computers with minimum processing power and memory. They rely on a basic operating system (OS) and a network connection to access a more powerful system where almost all computing processes take place.

Zero clients work the same way. The only difference is that there’s no local storage or OS installed on the device; all the software, storage, and processing power sits on a server until you need it. This setup makes a zero client ideal for cutting costs.

What are the benefits of using thin and zero clients?

Reduced hardware costs
If you want computers with low upfront costs, choose thin and zero clients. Conventional desktops start at $600 per user, while thin clients can go as low as $250 per user. And since they have no hard drive or other moving parts, lean devices tend to be more durable and have a longer life span than their traditional counterparts.

Simplified IT management
Another benefit of thin and zero clients is that they can be managed from a server. Suppose a new software update is released. Instead of manually downloading the patch on each computer, you can simply install the update on your server and roll it out to all thin and zero clients.
Apart from installing updates, you can also make backups, security configurations, and application deployments in the data center. This quickens setup, reduces downtime, and increases employee productivity.

Minimized security risks
Thin and zero clients also help you prevent costly malware attacks and data breach incidents. Your employees and poorly managed endpoints are the biggest vulnerabilities with traditional desktops. Thin and zero clients reduce these problems by limiting direct access to the OS. This prevents employees from copying sensitive data to removable media and installing software, malicious or otherwise.

If your thin or zero client is damaged or corrupted, you don’t have to worry about your data, as it’s originally stored in an impenetrable server.

Decreased energy consumption
Because processing is done locally, traditional desktops generate a lot of heat and require more power, resulting in huge power and cooling bills. In contrast, thin and zero clients consume only 4 to 6.5 watts of power, almost 1/50th of thick client requirements. What’s more, they require little to no cooling, allowing you to enjoy significant cost savings.

Do not overlook thin and zero clients if you’re searching for ways to cut costs without compromising outcomes. The reduced hardware costs, power bills, and security risks are just too good to pass up.

If you’re still unsure about this technology, give us a call. We’ll assess your tech needs and determine whether or not thin or zero clients can help you succeed.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Microsoft 365 signals a new era of productivity for SMBs

Microsoft 365 signals a new era of productivity for SMBs

In April 2020, Microsoft launched Microsoft 365, the successor to its popular Office 365. But it’s not a mere name change. The tech giant is also introducing improvements to its productivity software that will enhance how your business deals with cyberthreats every day.

Name change

Microsoft has time and again shown that they are willing to make drastic changes to their products and services in the name of development. Their Windows 10 operating system (OS), for instance, is a far cry from its predecessor Windows 8. Microsoft made the jump from what they thought would be a revolutionary tile-based design in Windows 8 to a classic, ergonomically designed Windows 10.

The tech giant has once again made drastic changes, this time to their award-winning line of productivity apps Microsoft Office 365. O365, as it was lovingly referred to for nearly a decade, is now the sleeker, more powerful, Microsoft 365 Business.

Microsoft 365 Business is available to small- to mid-sized businesses (SMBs) on three different subscription plans: Business Basic, Business Standard, and Business Premium.

Available plans

Microsoft 365 Business Basic

Microsoft 365 Business Basic comes with many standard features, including web and mobile app access, full email and calendaring tools, secure file storage, collaboration tools, and support. Rest easy knowing that you have a powerful enterprise-grade software for a fraction of the cost such as:

  • Web and mobile app versions of Office apps
  • Real-time coauthoring
  • Email hosting with 50 GB capacity
  • 1 TB of OneDrive storage
  • Automatic syncs regardless of work platform choice (between OneDrive and SharePoint).
  • Teleconferencing and unified communications via Microsoft Teams for up to 250 users
  • Automatic threat defense via Exchange Online Protection
  • A complete array of cybersecurity tools and protocols, such as automated password policy tools

Microsoft 365 Business Standard

With the Microsoft 365 Business Standard plan, you’ll get everything Business Basic offers plus:

  • Desktop versions of Office apps for up to five PCs or Macs per user
  • Easy and smart appointments management with Microsoft Bookings
  • Real-time mileage tracking and reporting with MileIQ

Microsoft 365 Business Premium

Microsoft 365 Business Premium is the brand’s flagship plan, a great tool for businesses ready to take their operations to the next level. It comes with everything Business Standard offers plus:

  • Advanced security tools to protect from zero-day threats and ransomware, via Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection
  • Remote wiping tools for stolen or lost devices, via Selective Wipe from Intune
  • Restricted copying or saving options for unauthorized apps and locations
  • Complete control of company data, via Information Rights Management
  • Pre-breach threat resistance policy options, via Windows Defender Exploit Guard
  • Malware protection, via Windows Defender
  • Unlimited cloud archiving of emails, via Exchange Online Archiving
  • Setup wizards for Windows 10, iOS, and Android
  • Total security policy deployment — even for mobile apps — via Mobile Device Management from Intune

Microsoft 365 Business will change the way your staff powers your business. Contact us today to discuss how you can avail of a subscription.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Why does HTTPS matter?

Why does HTTPS matter?

Almost everyone in the world browses the internet every day. People look up information, shop, chat with friends, or just pass the time by surfing the web. Internet browsing has become second nature to us that we often forget one thing: checking our address bar for an “S” after the “HTTP” prefix.

HTTPS encryption

The “s” in HTTPS stands for “secured”. It was introduced in 1995, so older websites that have been left on its own without regular maintenance usually don’t have it. But even to this day, unsecure websites exist, and fraudsters can easily take advantage of them.

When you visit a site with an HTTP connection, everything you type or click on that website is sent without encryption. This means that anyone who intercepts the data transferred between the website and your computer can readily view them. Cybercriminals can exploit this fact to gain access to your personal data, Social Security number, credit card information, and the like. This puts you at risk of identity theft and other fraudulent activities.

HTTPS certificates

When you visit a website, your computer uses an online directory to translate its alphanumeric name into a numerical address. It then saves that information on your computer, so that it doesn’t have to check the online directory every time you visit the same website.

In the event that your computer gets compromised, it could be tricked into directing a perfectly safe web address like www.google.com to a malicious website. Most of the time, users are sent to sites that look exactly like the legitimate site, but are actually fake copies designed to trick them into divulging their credentials.

To prevent such things from happening, the online directories mentioned earlier issue an ecosystem of certificates that turn HTTP into HTTPS, making it impossible for anyone to be redirected to a fraudulent website.

How does this affect our daily browsing habits?

We often visit a multitude of websites in a short period of time without checking each one for padlocks and certificates. Unfortunately, we can’t ignore the importance of HTTPS, so here are a few things to consider the next time you browse the internet:

  • If your browser marks a website as “unsafe,” think twice about clicking “Proceed anyway.” Only click the prompt if you are absolutely certain nothing will be transmitted.
  • Add web browser extensions such as HTTPS Everywhere that create encrypted connections to unencrypted websites. These extensions encrypt your communication with websites, and are compatible with Chrome, Firefox, and Edge browsers.
  • Always be vigilant. Some sites may have HTTPS but it doesn’t mean they’re safe. For example, goog1e.com (with the “l” replaced with a one) could have a certificate, but the misspelling indicates it to be an untrustworthy site. Cybercriminals use similar spellings of authentic websites to fool people into thinking that they’re in a secure site. This is called typosquatting or URL hijacking.
  • And perhaps, just follow the easiest step of all: avoid sites that don’t use the HTTPS protocol.

If you want to learn more about safer browsing habits and endpoint security, give our office a call.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

How MSPs are supporting clients during the COVID-19 pandemic

How MSPs are supporting clients during the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic and the sweeping shutdowns to contain the spread of the virus brought about significant impacts on businesses. Many small companies realized they lacked the resources to rapidly adopt a remote work setup and tapped their IT partners to help address their technology demands. Here’s how managed IT services providers (MSPs) are rising to the challenge.

Providing infrastructure and service desk capabilities

In today’s digital work landscape, MSPs are keeping their noses to the grindstone to fulfill customer demands and help keep businesses running. While many small companies have taken the first step of transitioning to remote work, they still need help managing the logistics.

Right now, MSPs are providing customers with IT infrastructures and taking on a host of network tasks, including configuring hardware, establishing remote connections, and managing backup and storage options, among other activities. These all help to ensure that company networks are reliable enough to facilitate a remote workforce.

MSPs are also offering service desk capabilities, providing companies with a centralized resource for employees, customers, and business partners to answer questions, troubleshoot problems, and facilitate solutions. Appropriate and timely support is crucial, especially in times of great uncertainty.

Simplifying cloud adoption

Cloud solutions are ideal if IT environments must be quickly modified to meet changing demands or difficulties, which is why MSPs are now helping businesses leverage a variety of cloud technologies and even move their data and applications online.

And because cloud migration can get complex, many MSPs are also offering managed migration plans that help companies transition key workflows and processes to the cloud safely and efficiently.

Offering remote support where possible

The current travel restrictions and social distancing measures make work-related travel difficult and risky. And with highly distributed workforces, many companies would rather source local service technicians for break/fix assistance, cabling, and other IT solutions.

Partnering with MSPs ensures that systems and networks are protected all the time and critical support is provided within 24 hours. What’s even better is that some providers have technicians in different locations, making it easy to provide tools, resources, and support even in hard-to-reach areas.

Delivering flexible solutions

As business needs continue to shift, MSPs must move in lockstep and provide support wherever they can. Here are some other ways MSPs are helping their clients navigate these trying times:

Assisting with IT projects
Because of how broad and challenging IT projects can be, it’s not uncommon for companies to lack the right skills and resources to handle them. MSPs are helping them by providing the expertise and technologies needed to pursue these projects, allowing companies to keep moving forward.

Foregoing long-term contracts
Some companies need IT support and services but can’t afford to commit to long-term contracts. Similarly, some want to augment their IT only for the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic. What’s great is many MSPs are providing flexible IT solutions, giving customers all the services and support they need, when they need them.

Offering faster response times
Especially now that downtime could likely spell the end of a business, companies seek quick turnaround times. Since MSPs typically offer 24/7 support and tout specialists with a wide range of experience and knowledge, they can proactively address issues and ensure that IT infrastructures are working as efficiently as possible.

Providing better customer service

As many businesses are still adjusting to the new normal, providing positive customer experiences will go a long way to earning trust and ensuring customer loyalty post-crisis. By being compassionate and empathetic to the situations of their customers, MSPs are showing companies that they’re navigating these trying times together.

Call our IT experts today to help configure the perfect remote work setup for your business.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Watch out for this Android malware

Watch out for this Android malware

Security researchers have discovered a new Android malware called DEFENSOR ID that snuck its way into the Google Play Store. Forensic analysis shows that the malware takes advantage of an Android device’s Accessibility Services to infiltrate the system and cause damage without being detected. To help you avoid this dangerous strain of malware, we’ve compiled everything you need to know in this blog entry.

What is DEFENSOR ID?

DEFENSOR ID is a banking Trojan that minimizes its malicious capabilities to sneak past security checks and infiltrate the Google Play Store. The malware’s primary function is to request access to an Android device’s Accessibility Service, which would allow hackers to execute a variety of commands.

For starters, if unwitting users grant access to DEFENSOR ID, the malware can observe any launched apps and send sensitive information back to hackers. This means hackers can steal anything from passwords and private emails to banking information and one-time SMS activation codes for two-step verification processes.

DEFENSOR ID also allows hackers to remotely uninstall apps, launch programs, and perform gestures (e.g., tap, swipe, click) within the launched program. In theory, this feature can enable hackers to empty a victim’s bank account with minimal effort.

What’s more, the Trojan extends the lock screen timeout to 10 minutes so that cybercriminals have enough time to perform their malicious operations.

Beware of apps leveraging Accessibility Services

According to researchers, DEFENSOR ID targeted Brazilian users and was downloaded over a dozen times. But despite its small success rate, it’s possible that more malware will leverage these techniques to steal sensitive information and control user devices. In fact, earlier in 2020, McAfee researchers discovered Android/LeifAccess malware that exploited Accessibility Services to leave fake reviews on the Google Play Store.

Plus, a common Android issue is that many independent software developers can upload their apps to the Google Play Store and easily circumvent security checks. So, if users aren’t thoroughly vetting the apps they download onto their devices, attacks similar to DEFENSOR ID will become more widespread.

Malware that can abuse Accessibility Services may even give rise to more deceptive online scams or massive-scale data breaches that can shut down businesses.

How to defend against DEFENSOR ID

Developing a healthy skepticism of apps in the Google Play Store is the best way to prevent malware attacks like DEFENSOR ID. This involves training your staff to get in the habit of evaluating an app before downloading it. More specifically, they should be verifying whether user reviews seem authentic, checking the total ratings and downloads, and consulting with security experts whether an app is safe.

Businesses should also use endpoint security software to control what apps users can install on their company-registered devices. By limiting downloads to a few, fully verified apps, you can minimize your company’s exposure to mobile malware.

If you want to keep your business safe from malware and other cyberthreats, it’s in your best interest to call cybersecurity experts like us. Not only do we provide top-notch security solutions, but we also offer proactive maintenance services to protect your IT at all times.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Give your home Wi-Fi a boost with wireless repeaters and access points

Give your home Wi-Fi a boost with wireless repeaters and access points

More and more people are working from home these days, which means a fast, reliable home Wi-Fi connection is more important than ever. If all the Wi-Fi boosting tips you’ve seen on the internet have been to no avail, it’s probably time to take a look at the hardware you’re using. It might be that you need wireless repeaters and additional access points.

Both wireless repeaters and access points are simple and inexpensive, and getting either or both of these devices can improve your home Wi-Fi.

Wireless repeaters are devices that extend the limited reach that Wi-Fi routers tend to have, especially in structures with thick walls and multiple floors. They receive a signal from a Wi-Fi router and rebroadcast it as a new network. This new network is an extension of the main network, enabling the signal from your router to be transmitted over long distances or to the other side of obstructions, such as a wall, post, or ductwork.

On the other hand, access points are devices that allow wireless devices to connect to a network. Your router at home is actually an access point, and while most access points have built-in routers, others have to be connected to a router. Access points are usually hardwired to network switches or modems.

Getting started

But before you go out and buy these devices, conduct a survey of the Wi-Fi signal throughout your home first. This will help you map out where to place repeaters and access points to maximize your Wi-Fi connection. This involves:

  • Determining the reach of your router. Use a Wi-Fi analyzer app such as NetSpot, Wifi Analyzer, or OpenSignal.
  • Locating dead zones, or areas that don’t get a Wi-Fi signal, in your house. This can usually be solved by moving your router or modem to an area where the signal is better.
  • Checking for obstructions (walls, furniture, plastics, water, etc.) and sources of interference (baby monitors, microwave ovens, radios, etc.). Any of these may be blocking or slowing down your Wi-Fi connection.

Based on your analysis, identify the best places to put the repeater and access point. For instance, if your router is in the living room and you can’t get a good signal in your bedroom down the hall, place the access point outside the living room and the repeater in the bedroom. The signal will be extended by the access point and picked up by the repeater, which will then broadcast it to nearby devices. Note that wireless repeaters must be set up in areas where the signal is poor, not in dead zones.

Setting up wireless repeaters and access points

Most brands and models of wireless repeaters and access points follow the same setup process.

Wireless repeaters

  1. Choose a location free from obstructions that can block signals from your Wi-Fi router.
  2. Plug the repeater into a power outlet.
  3. Using an Ethernet cable, connect the repeater directly to a computer. You can also connect the computer to the repeater’s wireless network.
  4. On your computer, enter your Wi-Fi network’s password.
  5. Any other steps to setting up your wireless repeater should be in the manufacturer’s instructions.

Access points

  1. Choose a location free from obstructions that can block signals from your Wi-Fi router.
  2. Turn off your router or modem and computer. Connect your access point to your router or modem and to your computer using an Ethernet cable.
  3. Turn on your router or modem, and plug the access point into an electrical outlet.
  4. Turn on your computer, and start enjoying better Wi-Fi performance.
  5. Any other steps to setting up your access point should be in the manufacturer’s instructions. You can also change optional and advanced router settings by connecting to your router using the IP address provided in the manual, or either 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1.

If you need more information about setting up and getting the most out of your wireless network, whether at home or in the office, get in touch with our experts today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Microsoft 365 update channels: What you need to know

Microsoft 365 update channels: What you need to know

Many businesses using Microsoft 365 prefer to have the latest versions of the productivity suite’s applications. Some businesses prefer to get updates as soon as they become available, while others prefer to update their systems on a predictable schedule. Fortunately, Microsoft’s update channels enable businesses to customize when they receive apps’ new features.

New update channel: Microsoft Enterprise Channel

The new Microsoft Enterprise Channel is for organizations that prefer to get updates on a predictable schedule. With this update channel, users can receive new features and patches on the second Tuesday of every month, which Microsoft famously calls Patch Tuesdays.

This update channel is ideal for companies with IT departments that want to reduce the burden of updating systems at irregular intervals. This will allow them to have a fixed schedule of downloading the latest productivity features, system improvements, and essential security patches.

Recommended update channel: Current Channel

Current Channel is great for companies that want to receive feature updates as soon as they become available. New Office features are released at least two or three times a month, so those that choose Current Channel will get them immediately.

The same applies to non-security updates such as reliability and performance improvements, which are also released two to three times a month. As standard, security updates will be released on Patch Tuesdays, and are therefore released on a fixed schedule.

Those who are only about to install Microsoft 365 apps will be on Current Channel by default. That means they’ll get feature updates, security updates, quality updates, and bug fixes whenever they’re ready, and can expect to receive two to three updates every month.

Option for less frequent updates: Semi-Annual Enterprise Channel

This option is for organizations that require a longer period to receive new features. This especially applies to those that use devices that must undergo extensive testing before receiving new features, perhaps to comply with governmental and regulatory authorities or for other unique reasons.

Under this update channel, organizations receive feature updates twice annually: in January and July, on the second Tuesday of the month. Security updates are still sent once a month, on Patch Tuesdays, similar to Microsoft Enterprise Channel and Current Channel.

Updates to existing update channels

Another important change is the new names of the Microsoft 365 update channels. Organizations can choose from the following options: Current, Monthly, or Semi-Annual (formerly Insider, Monthly, and Semi-Annual). In addition, testing channels previously labeled Targeted have been renamed Preview.

It’s important to select the right update channel for your organization to keep system updates streamlined and IT workflows uninterrupted. Choosing an update channel also depends on the user preferences of your business — whether they’d rather use the latest versions of their apps or would be fine to wait — as well as your business’s rules on compliance.

To learn more about Microsoft’s update channels, specifically, how to know which one’s best for your company and how to optimize your productivity apps, call our IT and software experts today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto

Why you need the cloud in the middle of COVID-19

Why you need the cloud in the middle of COVID-19

With the COVID-19 lockdowns forcing most economic sectors to slow down, cloud technology can help your business survive and remain competitive. More specifically, you can cut costs and increase operational efficiency using the cloud.

Ensuring continuity and efficiency with the cloud

The need to stay at home and practice social distancing have changed the way many businesses operate. With their employees unable to come to the office, organizations are forced to function with a remote team whose members are often miles away from each other.

This is where cloud technology helps. When you migrate your data to the cloud, your files are stored in a centralized server that can be accessed via the internet. So as long as a user has an internet-connected device (like a smartphone or laptop) and has the right login credentials, they can access these files from any location.

The cloud also allows multiple users to work on a single file at the same time. Any change to the file is seen in real-time, which makes it feel like team members are collaborating in the same room.

Moreover, with cloud-based communication tools like Slack, your team can communicate with each other through chat, voice calls, and video conferencing. By incorporating these technologies into your processes, your organization can function efficiently while following social distancing protocols.

Saving money with the cloud

Suddenly adopting a remote work setup after years of strictly on-site operations can take a lot of getting used to. One of the most difficult parts of transitioning is making sure you and your staff have the right hardware and software to perform work-related tasks.

Instead of buying hardware with company funds and issuing these machines to your staff, you can have them use their personal laptop computers and mobile devices instead. With this tactic, however, you’re not sure if your employees’ devices have the appropriate specifications to handle their workload.

If you use special software, you may also have to buy and install them on your staff’s personal devices. In short, whether you issue computers or adopt a bring your own device approach, you’re bound to spend a lot of money to facilitate remote work.

But with cloud computing, you won’t need to buy new hardware. You can host your applications on the cloud, enabling a user to run them through a web browser even if they are not installed in his or her device. And because hosted applications use the cloud provider’s resources, they don’t strain user’s devices and can be used even with older or lower-end computers.

Furthermore, hosting applications on the cloud eliminates the need to install programs in each of your staff’s devices. This is particularly helpful if the software you use has a limit on the number of devices it can be installed on. This way, you save money by not having to invest in newer devices for your staff and wasting time locally downloading the software.

Should you migrate to the cloud now?

The short answer is yes. Thanks to the COVID-19 lockdowns, the ability to work remotely has now become essential to a business’s survival. And the cloud easily facilitates a remote work environment.

See for yourself how the cloud lets you continue doing business even in the middle of a pandemic. Contact us today to get started!

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.


Source: Pronto